About Us

My Ferndale News was first envisioned and created to act as a hub of information about Ferndale and its business community in an effort to create increased awareness and support of local services and product offerings.

But the market quickly reacted and showed they were more interested in near real-time news stories about situations and decisions that impact day-to-day life. For instance, stories about what caused a traffic jam, what all the sirens were about and severe weather to be prepared for immediately drew huge numbers of visitors to the website.

As a marketer, the founder of My Ferndale News, Joe Beaulaurier, knew to listen to the market and go the direction they wanted. As a result, My Ferndale News was redesigned to be the primary news source for people who live, work and visit Ferndale and the surrounding area. At the time it was named, Discover Ferndale, which, after the change, was a bit of a misnomer and eventually changed to My Ferndale News.

My Ferndale News is not affiliated with any local government, school, first responder or law enforcement agency but has developed solid relationships with them all in order to better communicate their messaging as well as request information needed to inform the community about issues and emergency situations.

As of the writing of this page, the only staff at My Ferndale News, a dba of Whatcom Marketing LLC, is Joe Beaulaurier. Beaulaurier currently researches and writes the stories assisted by citizen volunteers who provide story tips and photos. He also built the website and maintains it while frequently testing additional functionality. Advertising sales and support also fall under his purview.

Visit the “Contact Us” page to contact My Ferndale News and the “Advertising” page to learn more about how your message can be more effectively delivered to people who live, work and recreate in Ferndale.

Editorial Guidelines

My Ferndale News story choices and how they are written at guided by some editorial guidelines that could be considered a result of what has caused other news outlets, large and small, to lose their audiences’ confidence and sense of value in their reporting of the news.

Some of these guidelines include

  • Report the facts and let the reader connect the dots. Do not insult their intelligence by attempting to do it for them.
  • The author’s opinion or personal assessment of a story does not matter at all. Just report the facts. It should be impossible for the reader to determine the author’s opinion or perspective from reading a story.
  • Avoid using adjectives whenever possible. This helps avoid the author’s opinion or personal assessment from entering into a story.
  • Report what people do, not what they say. People often have a talent for embellishing, deflecting and revising facts and data. As a result, reporting what someone says, unless part of a public record, is to be avoided. Opinions have little value and they are not in short supply. That which has been proposed, discussed, approved, filed or has simply happened should always be the focus.
  • Do not write about that which does not directly benefit the community. Local people who have achieved celebrity as entertainers is a good example. While successful in their own right, their success usually was accomplished elsewhere with little to no benefit beyond pride for the local community.
  • Promote local groups and teams. Community members coming together to achieve or even to simply attempt a positive community accomplishment is something we should all strive to do and is worth shining a light on editorially.